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Wednesday, November 02, 2011

Mapping UC Berkeley’s Dangerous Buildings and other Education GIS News

The Daily Californian uses a an interesting symbology to locate seismically challeged building on the Berkeley campus.

The map below highlights UC Berkeley buildings that are seismically rated “Poor” or “Very Poor” by the Seismic Action Plan for Facilities Enhancement and Renewal report released in 1997. The green pins mark buildings that were labeled “Poor” while the yellow pins mark buildings labeled “Very Poor” by the report, which was last updated in July 2011.

- Daily Californian

Among the presentations at “Reimagining the City-University Connection,” a symposium held October 21 at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, were:

Jessica Simes, [a] ... sociology doctoral student, and Benjamin Lewis, senior GIS specialist at Harvard’s Center for Geographic Analysis, collected data from the Boston Redevelopment Authority and mapped it onto the Boston Research Map, part of the open-source WorldMap system that allows users to publish their own maps and add to others’, integrating multiple data types and sources for the same geographic area.

- Harvard Magazine

Fourth-grade students at Tucker-Capps Elementary School took a yummy approach last week to learning about Virginia's five regions.

Using sugary ingredients such as green and blue frosting, strings of red licorice, corn flakes, caramel corn, and a chocolate cup, the students created edible maps of the state.

The activity was supervised by fourth-grade teacher Petra Roehrle in Georgie Burton's art class.

"Sometimes students have a hard time visualizing what the landforms look like because they don't have a map that they can feel and touch," Roehrle wrote in an email.

- Daily Press (Newport News, VA)

by Adena Schutzberg on 11/02 at 03:00 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

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