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Tuesday, October 12, 2010

The service built with FinSpehere, a fraud detection company, is called PinPoint comes in several flavors (below), but all do the same thing. When the registered credit card is run for a transaction, the app pings the associated cell phone to see if it’s nearby. That would mean the person (as represented by the phone) is near the car. If the two are not “close,” the service notifies the individual.

Versions:

Free: one cell phone with one credit card
Advanced ($7/month): for unlimited cards and three phones
Complete (price not announced): Advanced plan plus daily credit file monitoring (not yet available)

How does it work? Using location, but other tools are used to find fraud, so PinPoint also works when the phone is off, according the website FAQ. In particular, “We use other data like merchant type and purchase history to better detect fraud and help reduce false alerts.” Also noteworthy, once the questionable transaction is found, you pretty much have to do the reporting. “Within the message we will lay out the details of the incident and provide your bank’s customer service or fraud prevention phone number as well as give you a link to the fraud prevention tips section of our website.”

Also interesting: You must have Internet banking. I’m not really sure why. Since the transactions are tracked by PinPoint after they are reported by the bank, PinPoint may not know about a transaction until two days after it was made. Only then can it compare your stored location and determine if it was a risky situation. That lag may mean you may be well outside the two day window during which reported fraud charges are only charged $50.

It’s interesting this was announced this week, just after LOC-AID, a Location Labs competitor announced its ability to locate phones on many carriers. I wrote about that last week in Directions Magazine.

- press release
- RWW

by Adena Schutzberg on 10/12 at 01:33 PM | Comments | Bookmark and Share
lbs

The Microsoft team that developed innovative Cloud applications such as Pivot, Zoom.it, and Photosynth is now a part of Bing. That’s relevant to geospatial users since Photosynth and Seadragon and other goodies from Labs have great potential for our work.

- PC World

Perhaps related to the above news, former Yahoo executive Gary Flake, who led Live Labs for five years announced he’s leaving Microsoft.

- C|net

With Monday’s launch of Windows Mobile Phone 7, there was some creative TV advertising on “How I met Your Mother.” “A Windows-banded notebook, a full-screen Bing map every five minutes, and Maury Povich carring an Xbox 360 Slim?” Still, the reviewer thought it quite clever.

- CrunchGear

Esri announced the release of ArcGIS Mapping for SharePoint 2.0. “Simple to use software…” begins the PR title.

- press release

Windows Mobile 7 includes phone tracking: “Microsoft launched new Find My Phone service on Windows Live to remotely ring, lock, erase and spot the device on a map.”

- TechTree

Bing API update: “...new routing and geocoding features for Bing Maps REST Services – your choice when developing for mobile or when you’re looking for simplicity and speed on the web.”

- Bing Maps Blog

by Adena Schutzberg on 10/12 at 07:44 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

GeoEye will move its headquarters from Loudoun County to Fairfax County, Virginia, a move of about 10 miles. In doing so, it will l receive funding from Virginia in return for adding 100 new jobs over three years. The new space will allow two locations to merge and will allow for room to grow. Other states were considered, but in the end, moving down the road won. GeoEye employs about 550 people.

- Washington Post

by Adena Schutzberg on 10/12 at 07:25 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share
by Adena Schutzberg on 10/12 at 01:00 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share
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