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Friday, September 11, 2009

I got a jolt this morning, when on the bus, and listening to my favorite PR podcast I heard about how the Monopoly City Streets game I wrote about last week is built on both Google Maps and OpenStreetMap. I was sure the piece in error - I saw no mention of OSM in the coverage of the game. (The piece was actually an “ad” for a service called Custom Scoop - that company’s ads are all “news” so they are considered content in my book - wink, wink.)

But, I am incorrect! Per the OSM-Legal-Talk list and the OpenStreetMap list - it seems the game uses OSM tiles and Google Maps tiles. There are questions about if the provider of the game, Tribal DDB which is part of Hasbro Inc., is abiding by OSMs Creative Commons license.

And, after I looked I did find two media stories that noted OSM was in the mix. PCPro and PC World.

Maybe by the time our Location Intelligence Conference rolls around, OSM’s Steve Coast can tell us an interesting story about this.

by Adena Schutzberg on 09/11 at 02:33 PM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

Computerworld offers a heartwarming article about why DeLorme’s print Gazetteers, especially of remote areas in Maine, provide far more detail than online maps. Still:

A DeLorme spokesman would not disclose recent revenue figures or sales trends for the atlas series, but said the paper atlas market as a whole “is feeling some of the effect” of newer technologies.

 

by Adena Schutzberg on 09/11 at 02:08 PM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

You can find it here.

The slick part? You can drag a URL of a dataset found on Data.gov right to a dialog box and with the click of a button it’ll be added to the map. The shapefiles are zipped, so the app unzips them, then adds them. The speed was good, at least for the 99,000 points in the file I chose.

Room for improvement (though remember, this is a prototype!): The dataset URL is used as the theme name, so you really have to remember what the dataset is about! There’s no symbology control and keyboard combinations are used for navigation.

via @martenhogeweg

by Adena Schutzberg on 09/11 at 01:34 PM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

An article in the Denver Biz Journal discusses the site. I visited to see how one might help in the mapping effort which the state began organizing two years ago. What did I find?

Tools to “test my connection” - I had to input my Colorado address to test. (Of course I don’t have one.) There’s no indication how the data and my speed info might be used.

Detailed form to describe one’s broadband situation/concerns - Disappointingly it ask for lots of data and there is no information on the page about how it will or won’t be used. I found no privacy statement on the site at all.

A Survey Monkey “assessment.” Again, I found no assure of privacy.

I wonder how much input individuals will provide without any privacy assurances?

by Adena Schutzberg on 09/11 at 07:38 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

In what is believed to be a first for a Regional Council in New Zealand, the Northland Regional Council has decided to grant access to roughly 90 percent of the data currently on its GIS databases. (The remaining data is either owned by other organisations, is subject to privacy issues or the Council cannot contractually release it.)

A local company is hosting the data and small fee will be required to help cover some of those costs. The council will make no money on the deal. The decision was prompted by demand and the worldwide trends of sharing. Officials also suggest that the council will save money by not having staff do the work required to distribute the data.

- press release via Scoop.nz

by Adena Schutzberg on 09/11 at 07:24 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share
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