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Monday, July 09, 2007

Village Soup/Knox County (ME) Times has an article about a proposed plan for Rockland Harbor. The article includes a map, apparently taken from MapQuest, and enhanced (it’s a screen capture; it does not use the API). Below is this caption:

A map of O’Hara Corporation’s proposed project site in Rockland. (Photo by MapQuest.com)

I’m sure that was a cut and paste error, but I do have a point. As more citizen journalism and more students use the Web to search for and use content, they (and others) need guidance in how to cite such references. Let’s assume the map was used under “fair use” (I’m not sure it was). How is it to be cited? Must it include the copyright info for the data? (It does not.) Must it include a link? What do Manuals of Style say? What does MapQuest say?

by Adena Schutzberg on 07/09 at 06:00 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

The Sherrif in Cullman County Alabama got a new toy recently and showed it off at the area July 4th events. It’s a surplus Hurricane Katrina trailer now outfitted as a mobile command center. That’s not the interesting part, this is:

The unit’s computer system is equipped with Google Earth, which is a broadband 3D application that allows users to view three-dimensional maps by combining satellite imagery with the Google Search engine.

I note this because Pictometry was doing very well settling itself in exactly this space with its oblique imagery solutions. Certainly, the Google Earth client is maturing, as are the datasets, but I suspect the aerial obliques still have an edge (and are provided in many areas on Microsoft’s Live Search Maps). Moreover, the idea of depending on broadband in time of emergency sounds dodgy; you’d want that data local, woudn’t you? Perhaps data is available in addition to the Google Earth data? I hope so.

- The Cullman Times

by Adena Schutzberg on 07/09 at 06:00 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

Chris McCall lives in Provo, Utah. To identify potential clients for his pool cleaning business he used Google Earth to find properties that had pools. Then he drove around the city to determine their addresses.  Then he sent out fliers and business seems to be booming.

- KUTV

by Adena Schutzberg on 07/09 at 06:00 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

That’s the term John Hanke is using in discussing how KML, now in the hands of OGC, will help build out Google’s organizing of the world’s information.

The post-Where interview is republished in IT Management, it was originally in Internet News.

by Adena Schutzberg on 07/09 at 06:00 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share
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