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Tuesday, February 22, 2005

A short УodeФ to GIS appeared in a southern California and mentioned Roger Tomlison (oops) and only one GIS company, ESRI. The article runs down the history from Tomlinson, through the US Census use of GIS, to ESRI, to today where use is not hampered by cost (so the article reports) or technical skill. “They don’t need to be program savvy,’ said Steve Trammell, a corporate marketing representative for ESRI. “We’ve got grade school kids that are using our software for mapping projects.’” In another article from the same paper the story of how money raised from a cigarette tax is distributed with the help of GIS highlights a familiar challenge: using ZIP Codes to map data cause some misrepresentations.

by Adena Schutzberg on 02/22 at 07:00 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

A University of Arkansas professor is using laser mapping and GIS to explore the terrain of fossilized teeth. It turns out that the pits and bumps on teeth are a good indicator of what prehistoric animals ate. Called dental topographic analysis, the process involves a laser which reads the three-dimensional coordinates of the tooth at one-thousandth-inch slices along the surface. The software then calculates coordinates and produces a three-dimensional map of the tooth.

by Adena Schutzberg on 02/22 at 07:00 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

The state of New Jersey has expanded its relationship with ESRI to provide not only software to state non-government organizations (NGOs) but also training, technical assistance and OGIS metadata training (not sure what that is). The program has been renamed Initiative for Community Access to Technology (ICAT). While I love the idea of NGOs learning about and using GIS, I wonder if there are ways to provide more options. I know of at least one: the use of open source technology. At least one NGO is looking to use open source software to support other NGOs.

by Adena Schutzberg on 02/22 at 07:00 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share
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