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Tuesday, August 01, 2006

Last week Joe Francica noted some inconsistencies in press releases from Daratech and another from Bentley. Bentley claimed it was #2 in GIS software. Daratech said and that ESRI and Intergraph, comprised half of the market. Today, there’s an update. First, history.

The very first PR from Daratech this year (July 6) (all of which end with a link to an expensive report) stated:

Leading the market in software revenues were Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI), Bentley Systems, Incorporated and Intergraph Corporation.

The first explanatory Daratech PR (July 27) noted:

Although the two largest players, ESRI and Intergraph, together account for nearly half of the total software revenue, there are roughly 20 companies that each account for more than one percent of total annual software revenues. In fact, new buyers and sellers have increasingly contributed to 80% of the market’s total in 2004.

Today’s release (Aug 1) states:

Although the three largest players, ESRI, Intergraph and Bentley, together account for nearly half of the total software revenue, there are roughly 20 companies that each account for more than one percent of total annual software revenues.

Francica did contact Daratech about the confusion and still has not heard back. But clearly, Daratech did change its tune. Still, I’m not sure from this whether Bentley is #2 or #3.

by Adena Schutzberg on 08/01 at 06:04 PM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

It sounds as though this has been the case for some time, but only Google may put 10 meter or less imagery from DigitalGlobe on the Web. This from James Fee who read a post on the GeoWanking list.

To be clear, the rep at DigitalGlobe writes:

Our agreement with Google Earth does not allow for imagery to be posted to the web with less than 10-meter resolution.

There are a few exceptions - for instance media and state government - but this is a rule that is even stated in our licenses.

The writer at one point says that maybe Google might give permission as the person looking for imagery is from a non-profit. Equally amusing, the DG rep send the requestor to GeoEye!

I suppose this should come as no big shock. The U.S. DoD once bought up all the data from DigtialGlobe of Iraq (I believe I remember that right) during the war. This is the same thing, just from a commercial side. Anything is possible with enough money.

The other option was for Google to buy DigitalGlobe. Think it didn’t consider that? Think it didn’t consider sending up a bird? Do you think Microsoft has not thought of buying Pictometry? Or many GlobeXplorer (which owns AirPhotoUSA)? As much as GIS professionals poo poo what GYM are doing, and tout the value analysis (I do not disagree) the bottom line is that GYM are all over the data side of the equation. That’s why so many people love them.

by Adena Schutzberg on 08/01 at 03:07 PM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

Mikel Maron spoke at Where 2.0 on GeoRSS. AgencyCast apparently bootlegged a copy and now makes it available as an MP3. (It’s a bit “crunchy.”)

by Adena Schutzberg on 08/01 at 02:49 PM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

Two recent ads relating to geotechnology cross my path recently. Last night I was watching a taped rerun of CSI and saw a Duracell ad. It’s the latest in a series which included the one with the little boy playing with a toy robot. The idea was that the battery in his Phonac hearing aid (Floyd Landis’ team; that ad was my only connection to that company before the Tour) allowed him to hear the robot’s sounds for the first time. The new ad speaks about how native people’s in the Amazon are using GPS powered of Duracell to protect the land. There’s no official statement of which project is being addressed.

I was flipping through Wired (print edition) and after the last page of article text found a full page ad for NAVTEQ. It touted LBS and how NAVTEQ is the “map of choice.” Most interestingly, the ad only included one URL, that of the NAVTEQ Global LBS Challenge which is described this way:

an annual program supporting innovative developers and their companies

The website says:

It’s the contest that keeps on giving.


And it goes on to say it’s a developer contest.

Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate that NAVTEQ is creating incentives for LBS development. I’m just a bit confused as to what this program/contest/event is.

by Adena Schutzberg on 08/01 at 08:25 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

A press release (one oddly not on the Goodall Institute website) notes that the Institute now uses Google Earth as a front end to its five day a week blog on chimp behavoir. The blog is described as being a bit of a “soap opera” about chimps.

More interesting to our community, the solution shows how technology from ESRI and Google are both in use at the Institute. Goodall gave the plenary session at the ESRI User Conference last year. ESRI supports the institute’s work.

by Adena Schutzberg on 08/01 at 08:06 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share
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