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Friday, August 25, 2006

In the past few days I’ve had to contact several organizations to ask if a press release I saw on the Web was, well, real. Why? The release was not posted on the organization’s website. If I see a release that seems odd, doesn’t have a date, or is on a site about which I know little, I go to the website of the comapny/organization that the release is about, to see if the release is available there. Most of the time it is, and I’m confident it’s real (though perhaps not newsworthy). If it’s not there, I ping the media contact and most of the time learn it’s an oversight. (I get a “thanks for the reminder” e-mail.)

But this week some folks weren’t so fortunate. Several websites (Slashdot for one) got “taken” by a fake PR about the Sci Fi channel. Full debunkment at TVSquad.

via Wired

by Adena Schutzberg on 08/25 at 11:26 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

GridSkipper, a group blog on urban travel, points to the next frontier of mashups - mashing up the mashups. A poster wants to see a mashup of fast food places overlain with a mashup of demographics (SRC’s). Of course, that’s possible, but the idea that people are thinking this way if good news for mapping and for GIS.

by Adena Schutzberg on 08/25 at 09:16 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

At one point in my career I needed to get quick and dirty Web stats. I used a freebie service called StatCounter which was perfect for my needs. Recenly, the company upped the freebies and now provides a Google map with the locations of recent visitors.

by Adena Schutzberg on 08/25 at 09:12 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

Al Tompkins, writing at Al’s Morning Meeting, a resource for journalists at Poynter.org offers:

Google Earth is everywhere. And the ill-kept secret of the satellite/high altitude photography business is that its biggest clientele is the real estate industry, which uses the photos to help select the next location for a Wal-Mart, a Wendy’s or a subdivision.

I thought the biggest client was the the military/government. And, I thought all those “find the best place for the next Walgreens” analysis were done using mostly vector data, and demographic and traffic data. But, maybe I’m behind the times. Is imagery used this way?

by Adena Schutzberg on 08/25 at 08:19 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share

Crain’s Chicago Business noted the drop due to Robert Schwartz, analyst with Jefferies & Company Inc., decision to move the stock from a “buy” to a “hold.” The analyst raised questions about making 3rd quarter numbers.

Mr. Schwartz cited a decline in sport-utility vehicle sales, softening demand from one of Navteq’s key customers and increased competition as factors for his downgrade. He called the third-quarter consensus revenue estimate of $142 million “overly optimistic” and said that lower consumer demand for Navteq products are more likely to yield $138 million in third-quarter revenue.

The story also notes that Garmin expects a quiet 3rd quarter and that Tele Atlas is “aggressively pricing its product which competes with Navteq.”

by Adena Schutzberg on 08/25 at 08:05 AM | Comments | Bookmark and Share
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